Great Hall of Queen's House, Greenwich by National Maritime Museum Photo Studio

Great Hall of Queen's House, Greenwich

National Maritime Museum Photo Studio

Fine art poster

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  • Amazing giclée print quality
  • 280gsm thick fine art print paper
  • 100+ year colour guarantee
  • Dimensions:
    • x cm including border ( x in)
    • x cm excluding border ( x in)
£14.95

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Our prints

We use a 280gsm fine art paper and premium branded inks to create the perfect reproduction.

Our expertise and use of high-quality materials means that our print colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

Read more about our fine art prints.

Manufactured in the UK

All products are printed in the UK, using the latest digital presses and a giclée printmaking process.

We only use premium branded inks, and colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

Delivery & returns

We print everything to order so delivery times may vary but all unframed prints are despatched within 2-4 days via courier or recorded mail.

Delivery to the UK is £5 for an unframed print of any size.

We will happily replace your order if everything isn’t 100% perfect.

Great Hall of Queen's House, Greenwich by National Maritime Museum Photo Studio zoom

Great Hall of Queen's House, Greenwich

The Queen's House, Greenwich, was commissioned by Anne of Denmark, wife of James I (reigned 1603-25). James was often at the Tudor Palace of Greenwich, where the Old Royal Naval College now stands - it was as important a residence of the early Stuart dynasty as it had been for the Tudors.

In 1616 Anne commissioned Inigo Jones (1573-1652), who had risen to fame as a designer of court entertainments and was appointed Surveyor of the King's Works the following year, to design a new pavilion for her at Greenwich. It was apparently a place of private retreat and hospitality and was also designed as a bridge over the Greenwich to Woolwich Road, between the palace gardens and the Royal Park. Jones had recently spent three years in Italy studying Roman and Renaissance architecture. It was his first important commission and the first fully Classical building seen in England.
National Maritime Museum Photo Studio

  • Image reference: F6994

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