View of Royal Observatory Greenwich at night, taken from Flamsteed House by National Maritime Museum Photo Studio

View of Royal Observatory Greenwich at night, taken from Flamsteed House

National Maritime Museum Photo Studio

Fine art poster

More products…
  • Amazing giclée print quality
  • 280gsm thick fine art print paper
  • 100+ year colour guarantee
  • Dimensions:
    • by cm including border ( by in)
    • by cm excluding border ( by in)
£22.95

Image information

Greenwich
Part of the Greenwich Collection
Add to wishlist
Close

Our prints

We use a 280gsm fine art paper and premium branded inks to create the perfect reproduction.

Our expertise and use of high-quality materials means that our print colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

Read more about our fine art prints.

Manufactured in the UK

All products are printed in the UK, using the latest digital presses and a giclée printmaking process.

We only use premium branded inks, and colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

Delivery & returns

We print everything to order so delivery times may vary but all unframed prints are despatched within 2-4 days via courier or recorded mail.

Delivery to the UK is £5 for an unframed print of any size.

We will happily replace your order if everything isn’t 100% perfect.

View of Royal Observatory Greenwich at night, taken from Flamsteed House by National Maritime Museum Photo Studio zoom

View of Royal Observatory Greenwich at night, taken from Flamsteed House

The Great Equatorial Telescope is housed in the south-east dome. The 28-inch Greenwich refracting telescope is the largest of its kind in the UK and the seventh largest in the world. Completed in 1893 as a replacement for the 12¾-inch Merz that originally occupied its position, it was commissioned in 1885 by William Christie, Astronomer Royal between 1881 and 1911. It was designed to keep the Royal Observatory at the forefront of contemporary astronomy and more active in the growing disciplines of astrophysics and photography. The job of constructing the telescope was given to Howard Grubb, an Irish optical manufacturer who was then the world leader in the field.

Although the telescope was removed from Greenwich to Herstmonceaux in 1957, it was used for research into double star systems throughout its working life until its retirement in the late 1960s. It was returned to Greenwich in 1971, and has become a central part of educational programmes at the Royal Observatory. With the recent addition of a computer-aided guidance system and CCD camera, it continues to work as an excellent visual aid to observing the night sky.


National Maritime Museum Photo Studio

  • Image reference: D3155

Discover more

Search for similar images: