A Dutch ship close-hauled by Aert Anthonisz

A Dutch ship close-hauled

Aert Anthonisz

Fine art poster

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  • Amazing giclée print quality
  • 280gsm thick fine art print paper
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We use a 280gsm fine art paper and premium branded inks to create the perfect reproduction.

Our expertise and use of high-quality materials means that our print colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

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Manufactured in the UK

All products are printed in the UK, using the latest digital presses and a giclée printmaking process.

We only use premium branded inks, and colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

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We print everything to order so delivery times may vary but all unframed prints are despatched within 2-4 days via courier or recorded mail.

Delivery to the UK is £5 for an unframed print of any size.

We will happily replace your order if everything isn’t 100% perfect.

A Dutch ship close-hauled by Aert Anthonisz zoom

A Dutch ship close-hauled

Aert Anthonisz (1579-1620) was born in Antwerp, but moved to Amsterdam at an early age, presumably around 1590. Stylistically his seascapes betray a Flemish influence. The small panel of two Dutch three-masters off a rocky coast gliding through glassy-green waves with elegant white crests is characterized by the typical simplification and stylisation of the natural form, which is generally associated with the 16th century tradition of the Southern Netherlands. The same is true for the beholder's high viewpoint, which allows an overview of the deck of the three-master sailing before the wind at the centre of the composition. All details of the ship's rigging, such as the reef-points, are displayed with great merit. The artist, therefore, clearly distinguished between the rendering of nature and the man-made world. The meaning of the depicted action remains unclear. It is difficult to determine whether the ship is trying to escape both the rocks on the right and the Dutch battleship in the left background, or whether there is no specific narrative or allegorical meaning attached to the image. Images like this, possibly dated around 1610, laid an iconographic and stylistic basis for the development of the Dutch seascape later in the 17th century.
Aert Anthonisz

  • Image reference: BHC0713

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