A representation of the meteor seen at Paddington about 12 minutes before 11 o'clock, on the evening of the 11 February 1850 by Matthew Cotes Wyatt

A representation of the meteor seen at Paddington about 12 minutes before 11 o'clock, on the evening of the 11 February 1850

Matthew Cotes Wyatt

Fine art poster

More products…
  • Amazing giclée print quality
  • 280gsm thick fine art print paper
  • 100+ year colour guarantee
  • Dimensions:
    • x cm including border ( x in)
    • x cm excluding border ( x in)
£14.95

Image information

Add to wishlist
Close

Our prints

We use a 280gsm fine art paper and premium branded inks to create the perfect reproduction.

Our expertise and use of high-quality materials means that our print colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

Read more about our fine art prints.

Manufactured in the UK

All products are printed in the UK, using the latest digital presses and a giclée printmaking process.

We only use premium branded inks, and colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

Delivery & returns

We print everything to order so delivery times may vary but all unframed prints are despatched within 2-4 days via courier or recorded mail.

Delivery to the UK is £5 for an unframed print of any size.

We will happily replace your order if everything isn’t 100% perfect.

A representation of the meteor seen at Paddington about 12 minutes before 11 o'clock, on the evening of the 11 February 1850 by Matthew Cotes Wyatt zoom

A representation of the meteor seen at Paddington about 12 minutes before 11 o'clock, on the evening of the 11 February 1850

A mezzotint representation of a bright, exploding meteor seen over London in 1850. The image is dominated by the dark sky and streaking meteor, with rooftops and clouds just visible. The explosion and sparks of the meteor suggest that it was a bolide. It was drawn by Matthew Cotes Wyatt, who also produced the engraving so that 'a faithfully graphic exhibition of its appearance might be more generally diffused'. Wyatt was a painter and sculptor, and member of the Wyatt family of architects and sculptors. This meteor was evidently particularly spectacular and was widely reported, including in the Illustrated London News. The Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society record that George Airy, Astronomer Royal, had observed this meteor, and James Glaisher, Second Assistant, published observations of it in the Philosophical Magazine. An inventory of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, from 1893 records that a copy of this print was displayed on the staircase to the Octagon Room in Flamsteed House.
Matthew Cotes Wyatt

Original size: 325 mm x 454 mm

  • Image reference: PT3495

Discover more

More by the artist Matthew Cotes Wyatt.

Explore the collection Fine art.