Capt. Trollope in the 'Glatton', of 54 Carronades Engaging a French Squadron of 8 Ships of war carrying 230 guns by James Daniell

Capt. Trollope in the 'Glatton', of 54 Carronades Engaging a French Squadron of 8 Ships of war carrying 230 guns

James Daniell

Fine art poster

More products…
  • Amazing giclée print quality
  • 280gsm thick fine art print paper
  • 100+ year colour guarantee
  • Dimensions:
    • x cm including border ( x in)
    • x cm excluding border ( x in)
£14.95

Image information

Add to wishlist
Close

Our prints

We use a 280gsm fine art paper and premium branded inks to create the perfect reproduction.

Our expertise and use of high-quality materials means that our print colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

Read more about our fine art prints.

Manufactured in the UK

All products are printed in the UK, using the latest digital presses and a giclée printmaking process.

We only use premium branded inks, and colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

Delivery & returns

We print everything to order so delivery times may vary but all unframed prints are despatched within 2-4 days via courier or recorded mail.

Delivery to the UK is £5 for an unframed print of any size.

We will happily replace your order if everything isn’t 100% perfect.

Capt. Trollope in the 'Glatton', of 54 Carronades Engaging a French Squadron of 8 Ships of war carrying 230 guns by James Daniell zoom

Capt. Trollope in the 'Glatton', of 54 Carronades Engaging a French Squadron of 8 Ships of war carrying 230 guns

Coloured mezzotint entitled 'Capt. Trollope in the Glatton, of 54 Carronades Engaging a French Squadron of 8 Ships of war carrying 230 guns. At the commencement of this brilliant action which was fought of Helvoet on the 16th July 1796. Captain Strangways who commanded the Marines received a bad wound in the thigh from a musket ball, who after he had it dressed and a tourniquet put on, bravely insisted on coming to his quarters again, where he remained encouraging his men until actually fainting from loss of blood, Captn. Trollope to save his life was obliged to order him to be carried down again. Of this wound he died some months later.' The other casualty was Strangways's corporal, also wounded in the thigh. Henry Ludlow Strangways (his surname is variously spelt) wears the marine officers uniform introduced in 1787. The officer to his right, Captain Henry Trollope, is ordering him to leave the deck. The print illustrates a tradition of exemplary death in battle. Strangways does not die instantaneously but remains at his post doing his duty.
James Daniell

Original size: 575 mm x 705 mm

  • Image reference: PT2247

Discover more

More by the artist James Daniell.

Explore the collection Fine art.

Search for similar images: