Lowestoft lighthouse, a detailed study, with a beach yawl and other craft, and a pile of ballast pigs in the foreground by Edward William Cooke

Lowestoft lighthouse, a detailed study, with a beach yawl and other craft, and a pile of ballast pigs in the foreground

Edward William Cooke

Fine art poster

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  • Amazing giclée print quality
  • 280gsm thick fine art print paper
  • 100+ year colour guarantee
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    • x cm excluding border ( x in)
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We use a 280gsm fine art paper and premium branded inks to create the perfect reproduction.

Our expertise and use of high-quality materials means that our print colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

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Manufactured in the UK

All products are printed in the UK, using the latest digital presses and a giclée printmaking process.

We only use premium branded inks, and colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

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We print everything to order so delivery times may vary but all unframed prints are despatched within 2-4 days via courier or recorded mail.

Delivery to the UK is £5 for an unframed print of any size.

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Lowestoft lighthouse, a detailed study, with a beach yawl and other craft, and a pile of ballast pigs in the foreground by Edward William Cooke zoom

Lowestoft lighthouse, a detailed study, with a beach yawl and other craft, and a pile of ballast pigs in the foreground

In 1609 Trinity House, in responce to petitions from shipowners and merchants who had lost cargoes and vessels on the sandbanks and shoals around the east coast, established a lighthouse at Lowestoft. The structure consisted of a high and low light. Both were powered by candles, which, when viewed in line from the sea, guided small ships into port along the (now disappeared) Stamford Channel. The house was rebuilt in 1676 with a coal-fired high light. In 1730, the lower lamp was converted to burn whale oil. In 1777 the coal fire was replaced by a circle of oil lamps and a complex reflector system, the 'Spangle light', which had 400 mirrors and a greatly improved range of 20 miles. In 1874 a new high light, still in existance today, was completed. The latter burned paraffin and was fitted out with new optics and a revolving lens.
Edward William Cooke

Original size: 238 mm x 348 mm

  • Image reference: PV6351

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