Slave collar by unknown

Slave collar

unknown

Fine art poster

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  • Amazing giclée print quality
  • 280gsm thick fine art print paper
  • 100+ year colour guarantee
  • Dimensions:
    • x cm overall ( x in)
    • x cm image ( x in)
£14.95

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We use a 280gsm fine art paper and premium branded inks to create the perfect reproduction.

Our expertise and use of high-quality materials means that our print colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

Read more about our fine art prints.

Manufactured in the UK

All products are printed in the UK, using the latest digital presses and a giclée printmaking process.

We only use premium branded inks, and colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

Delivery & returns

We print everything to order so delivery times may vary but all unframed prints are despatched within 2-4 days via courier or recorded mail.

Delivery to the UK is £5 for an unframed print of any size.

We will happily replace your order if everything isn’t 100% perfect.

Slave collar by unknown zoom

Slave collar

Slave collars with iron links. On board slave ships, captive Africans were kept below decks for the vast majority of the time. Men, women and children were segregated. Men were usually kept shackled, handcuffed in pairs by their wrists and with iron leg rings riveted to their ankles. Frequently they had such little space that they could only lie on their sides and could not sit or stand up

These collars were from Cannon Hall near Barnsley, seat of the Spencer-Stanhope family. The family made their fortune as iron founders in South Yorkshire. In the 1750s, Benjamin Spencer-Stanhope (brother of the hall's owner), invested in a slave ship named after the house, although its voyage did not yield the expected profits. Walter Spencer-Stanhope his nephew, who inherited the hall in 1775, was a Tory MP of abolitionist sympathies and a friend of William Wilberforce.

  • Image reference: E9107

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