The capture of 'Nuestra Senora de Cavadonga' by Samuel Scott

The capture of 'Nuestra Senora de Cavadonga'

Samuel Scott

Fine art poster

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The capture of 'Nuestra Senora de Cavadonga' by Samuel Scott zoom

The capture of 'Nuestra Senora de Cavadonga'

At the outbreak of the War of the Austrian Succession in 1740, Commodore George Anson was sent to the Pacific with a squadron of six ships, his own being the 'Centurion', 60 guns. His instructions were to damage Spanish interests in the Pacific at a time when Spain and England were competing for maritime supremacy. Anson sailed via Cape Horn but by the time he reached Macao, China, in November 1742, 'Centurion', was the only surviving ship in his squadron, the others having been separated or wrecked. After wintering there he set off on 29 April 1743 in search of the immensely valuable Manila galleon 'Nuestra Senora de Covadonga', which he sighted while cruising through Philippine waters in June 1743. He immediately attacked the 'Covadonga', which was heavily laden with cargo from Acapulco. During an attempt to escape the Spaniards threw part of this into the ocean, to no avail, and Anson was able to seize the 'Covadonga's treasure of Spanish dollars, silver and other valuable goods. Its value was immense and not only ensured the financial success of the voyage but made Anson wealthy for life.
Samuel Scott

  • Image reference: BHC0360

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