The Liberty of the Subject [the Press Gang] by James Gillray

The Liberty of the Subject [the Press Gang]

James Gillray

Fine art poster

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  • Amazing giclée print quality
  • 280gsm thick fine art print paper
  • 100+ year colour guarantee
  • Dimensions:
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    • x cm excluding border ( x in)
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We use a 280gsm fine art paper and premium branded inks to create the perfect reproduction.

Our expertise and use of high-quality materials means that our print colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

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Manufactured in the UK

All products are printed in the UK, using the latest digital presses and a giclée printmaking process.

We only use premium branded inks, and colours are independently verified to last between 100 and 200 years.

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We print everything to order so delivery times may vary but all unframed prints are despatched within 2-4 days via courier or recorded mail.

Delivery to the UK is £5 for an unframed print of any size.

We will happily replace your order if everything isn’t 100% perfect.

The Liberty of the Subject [the Press Gang] by James Gillray zoom

The Liberty of the Subject [the Press Gang]

At the time this print was made 'liberty' was most generally understood as the concept of 'British liberty' as a whole, in opposition to foreign and especially Catholic 'tyranny'. The title is therefore more satirical than it probably seems today, vaunting the supposed 'liberty' of the common Englishman in a scene of a poor tailor being seized by a Naval press-gang in the City of London: the dome behind is that of St Paul's Cathedral. The resistance of the crowd is also notable: the press-gang was never popular and the print was made in 1779, just after France and Spain entered the War of American Independence on the side of the American rebels, for whom there was considerable radical sympathy in Britain. This turned it into a world wide war, and one requiring more men to man the fleet against those of these two powerful European enemies. However, the image deliberately misrepresents how the press operated, since it it was looking for seamen, not untrained and unfit landsmen, and those sometimes swept up were usually released on further enquiry.
James Gillray

Original size: 259 mm x 367 mm

  • Image reference: PX8527

Discover more

More by the artist James Gillray.

Explore the collections Broadsides: caricature & satire, Fine art.